Articles by: "Stephen Loosley"
On the screen: farce and fury

It was John Nance Garner, Franklin Roosevelt’s first vice president, who characterised his office most pithily and dismissively. The formidable Texas Democrat, ‘cactus Jack’, declared that the vice presidency of the United States was ‘not …

On the screen: a camera at the parapet

Peter Jackson’s film on the centenary of the Great War, They Shall Not Grow Old, is a masterpiece. Jackson has brought the hostilities of the Western Front of 1914–1918 to vivid life in a brilliantly …

From the bookshelf: ‘The perfect weapon’

The new cold war is being fought in cyberspace on a continuing basis and with ever more sophisticated technologies. The Western powers, principally the United States and its allies, confront growing intrusions from adversaries ranging …

From the bookshelf: ‘On grand strategy’

This is a superb book. John Lewis Gaddis is a distinguished academic at Yale University, occupying the Robert A. Lovett Professorship of History. He’s a strategic thinker of the first order, having won the Pulitzer …

On the screen: Laughter in the Lubyanka

Sydney’s Daily Telegraph left no one in any doubt as to its view of the death of Soviet dictator Josef Stalin on 5 March 1953. ‘Stalin Dead – Hooray!’ ran the headline on Frank Packer’s tabloid. This …

From the bookshelf: the AIF in Battle

Generations of Australians have been told that the Australian Light Horse Regiments, which distinguished themselves from the Sinai to Syria during the Great War, were not Cavalry. They were Mounted Infantry. Jean Bou, an historian …