Parliament’s power and the war powers

To examine how Australia goes to war, parliament must examine itself. How much can parliament touch the war prerogative of the prime minister and cabinet? What say should parliament have, if any, in the most …

Making sense of midterm America

Midterm elections take place in the United States every four years, halfway into a president’s term and two years before the next presidential election. At stake is one-third of the Senate, the entire House of …

How China’s censorship machine feeds on fear

The Chinese government’s online censorship regime isn’t new. It succeeded in ‘nail[ing] jello to a wall’, to use the words of former US president Bill Clinton, when the world thought the Chinese Communist Party wouldn’t …

Biden’s nuclear posture review is too timid for 2022

Nuclear weapons are serious capabilities, and declaratory policies are serious commitments. So readers who have followed the US government’s nuclear posture product line since President Bill Clinton’s first review in 1994 have learned to expect …

Labor’s defence budget sets out some hard truths

The Albanese government’s first budget since its election win in May was not designed to focus on Australia’s security situation or defence spending. Tasked with sharing Australia’s difficult economic situation with the Australian public, the …