Articles by: "Stephen Loosley"
From the bookshelf: Stalin as war lord

There is only one hill of any consequence in the city of Volgograd (Stalingrad). It is Mamayev Kurgan, which became a critical point of battle for both the German Wehrmacht and the Soviet Red Army …

On the screen: Cold warriors

The Courier, directed by Dominic Cooke, is a film of the Cold War with the Cuban missile crisis of 1962 as backdrop. The central characters, British salesman Greville Wynne (Benedict Cumberbatch) and GRU (Soviet military …

From the bookshelf: Why spy?

Between the diplomatic dance and the infernal destruction of war is to be found the opaque art of espionage. Two recent novels dissect the art of espionage with a knowing eye and a clinical precision. …

On the screen: farce and fury

It was John Nance Garner, Franklin Roosevelt’s first vice president, who characterised his office most pithily and dismissively. The formidable Texas Democrat, ‘cactus Jack’, declared that the vice presidency of the United States was ‘not …

On the screen: a camera at the parapet

Peter Jackson’s film on the centenary of the Great War, They Shall Not Grow Old, is a masterpiece. Jackson has brought the hostilities of the Western Front of 1914–1918 to vivid life in a brilliantly …