Articles by: "John Coyne"
What’s next for the Australian Border Force?

The Abbott era ‘mega department’ thinking might be passé, but there are still more than a few bureaucrats and politicians advocating the creation of an Australian department of homeland security. While Peter Jennings and I …

Counterterrorism: acting without thinking?

While Australia faces complex prickly national security challenges, our Prime Minister, Premiers and Chief Ministers continue to paradoxically announce quick fix policy measures in response to terrorism and crime. From cement bollards in Sydney and …

Border security: lessons from a fractured Europe

Brexit, and the US presidential election result, provided tangible evidence that migration and border security policies are becoming increasingly politicised in Western democracies. Public policy dialogue on migration and border security has become ever more …

The future of the Jakarta Centre for Law Enforcement Cooperation

ASEAN’s various high-level commitments to cooperation on counterterrorism and transnational organised crime have proven difficult to operationalise into police-to-police action. There’s been no shortage of rhetoric from senior ASEAN officials and politicians supporting regional cooperation …

Where to next for the JCLEC?

For thirteen years, the Jakarta Centre for Law Enforcement Cooperation (JCLEC) has served as a regional rally point for much needed counterterrorism capacity development and cooperation. Since its inception in 2004 with strong bilateral support …

America’s ‘Maginot Line’

Regardless of who wins today’s US presidential election, migration and border security will continue to be central policy issues for America and Americans. The border security policy dialogue in the US, like that in Australia, …

Understanding the limits of intelligence

Last week, Sir John Chilcot’s review revealed that in 2003 the then British Prime Minister, Tony Blair, committed his country to the US-led invasion of Iraq based on ‘flawed intelligence and assessments’. After the report’s …

Fault lines in Cambodia

It’s almost 20 years since Cambodia’s last military coup, but the country’s domestic security situation remains fragile. Over the last two years a number of events hint that the political and security situation in this Mekong …

National security leaking and the Farrell case

The other week, ASPI’s Cesar Alvarez and Simon Norton published a cogent argument for the greater protection of Australia’s private and public sector whistle-blowers. With startling statistics, Cesar and Simon highlight that: ‘…of the 80% …